Wednesday Drill of the Week: 4 Dot Shooting

4 Dot Shooting

Simple shooting drill that encompasses a number of skating and stick skills. Players line up on the four dots with pucks in all four lines. Opposite lines start. Player one makes a pass and then skates a button hook pattern with a mohawk maneuver at the end. The player in the line opposite receives the pass and bumps it to the next player in the line that started the drill. That player then passes to the player who skated the pattern who goes in and takes a shot.

Another variation is to have the player who skates the pattern exchange with the opposite line twice while skating towards them, then receive a flat pass while they are mohawking towards the boards.

While the execution of the drill is simple, players need to focus on doing everything at full speed. Passes should be flat and on the tape. The skating pattern should develop a players ability to use their edges. Player need to attack the net hard with a wide drive and shoot in stride, stopping at the net for a rebound opportunity.

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Wednesday Drill of the Week: Warmup Series

This year, we tried a new concept in starting our practices with a three zone warmup at least once per week. The drills would differ, but the format would remain the same.

Warmup Series

In this example, we would start with three players stationary on each circle in one zone and have them pass (3 Man Passing). We would do variations such as backhand only, catch with forehand drag to backhand and pass, catch on backhand pull to forehand and pass, saucer passes, etc. In the middle, we had 2v1 keep away with the same three man group that did the passing. All six would skate around the neutral zone, but you would do keep away just with your three guys. In the far zone we did 3v3 cross ice. Whistle blows every 60-90 seconds to advance to the next zone, and we would work each zone anywhere from 3-5 times per group.

Generally, we would do a passing drill in the first zone, a skill drill in the middle and a game in the far zone. There are a number of variations that are possible in each zone – be creative!